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MILITARY PROGRAMS

    Army Reserve
    Officers’ Training Corps Studies
    Air Force Studies (Air Force ROTC)

ARMY RESERVE

OFFICERS’ TRAINING CORPS STUDIES

Army ROTC is a college elective that focuses on leadership and management skills. The ROTC program consists of the Basic Course and the Advanced Course. The Basic Course provides college students the opportunity to learn about and experience the U.S. Army without incurring any military obligation during their freshman and sophomore years. The Advanced Course prepares juniors, seniors, and graduate students for commissioning as officers in the active U.S. Army, U.S. Army Reserve, or Army National Guard.

Two-Year or Four-Year Program

The program in military science may be completed in either two or four years. The two-year program requires students to have a minimum of 54 semester hours and meet the qualifications to enter the Advanced Course. The qualifications for entering the Advanced Course include completion of one of the following: MIL 250 Leader Training Course; four years of high school Junior ROTC; prior military service (veteran) or completion of Basic Training with the National Guard/Reserve. All students entering the Advanced Course receive a monthly tax-free stipend for 10 months of the year ($450 for juniors and $500 for seniors). The four-year program requires students to take Basic Course electives at the University and then enter the Advanced Course.

Basic Course

The Basic Course refers to freshman-level and sophomore-level Military Science electives. Students wishing to enter the Basic Course simply register for one or more of the course electives. There is absolutely no military obligation incurred by taking these electives for freshman students or nonscholarship sophomores. The minimum electives necessary for completing the Basic Course follow:

MIL 110 Leadership and National Security. 1 hour.
MIL 120 Foundations of Leadership and Team Development.1 hour.
MIL 210 Basic Leadership Skills. 2 hours.
MIL 220 Military Leadership Skills. 2 hours.
MIL 250 Leader’s Training Course. 6 hours.

Students taking Military Science classes as electives are not required to wear uniforms.

Advanced Course

The Advanced Course consists of junior-level and senior-level Military Science electives. The course requires students to take the electives in sequence unless authorized by the professor of military science, and complete the Leader Development & Assessment Course (LDAC). The LDAC is a paid 32-day leadership evaluation course conducted at Fort Lewis, Washington, during the summer between the junior and senior years. The Advanced Course consists of the following core courses.

MIL 310 Small Unit Tactical Leadership. 3 hours.
MIL 320 Advanced Military Leadership. 3 hours.
MIL 410 Ethics and the Military as a Profession. 3 hours.
MIL 420 Advanced Leadership and Management Techniques. 3 hours.

Army ROTC Scholarship Program

Army ROTC offers four-year, three-year, and two-year scholarships. The scholarships pay 100 percent resident or nonresident tuition; $900 per year for books; and a monthly tax-free stipend for 10 months of the year ($300/month for freshmen, $350/month for sophomores, $450/month for juniors, and $500/month for seniors). All enrolled cadets are also eligible to compete for a number of awards provided by alumni endowments, ranging from $200 to $1,000 per year. Army ROTC selects freshman scholars based on high-school GPAs, ACT or SAT scores, class standing, extracurricular activities, and scholarship interviews. High-school students can apply online for four-year scholarships at armyrotc.com. The deadline for four-year scholarship applications is normally November 15 each year. Three-year and two-year scholarship selections (undergraduates and graduate students) are based on college GPA, Army Physical Fitness Test scores, leadership potential, and scholarship interviews. Initial selections for three-year and two-year scholarships are made in late April. Applications for campus-based scholarships are accepted year-round at the Military Science Department, 610 Capstone Drive, located adjacent to the Alabama Museum of Natural History. Interested applicants should contact the Army ROTC department at (205) 348-1056 or via bama.ua.edu/~armyrotc/.

Army ROTC Stipend

All Army ROTC sophomores, juniors, and seniors who meet the eligibility requirements for contracting are eligible for a tax-free stipend for 10 months of the year ($350/month for sophomores, $450/month for juniors, and $500/month for seniors). Eligibility requirements include a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.0; passage of the Army Physical Fitness Test; meeting DODMERB physical exam qualifications; being a U.S. citizen, full-time student, and of good moral character.

Degree Credit toward Minor

All Army ROTC courses are fully accredited University classes. Credit for these courses can be applied toward elective credit or a minor in Civic Engagement and Leadership (CEL) through the College of Arts and Sciences. This minor consists of 19 semester hours, of which at least 6 hours must be 300- or 400-level courses. In addition, students must take PHL 200 or PHL 202 and NEW 237 or NEW 238. Students may apply up to 12 semester hours of military science courses toward the civic engagement and leadership minor. It is recommended that Army ROTC cadets apply credit for MIL 310, MIL 320, MIL 410, and MIL 420 toward this minor and take PHL 200 or PHL 202 and NEW 237 or NEW 238. This course of action provides 12 semester hours of credit toward the minor, meets the 300- or 400-level course requirements, and provides core degree credit for a humanities course. For additional details, please contact the Military Science Department at (205) 348-1056.

Uniforms and Equipment

All students who are authorized to receive uniforms and equipment must make a $25 deposit with the University bursar. Once a deposit is made with the bursar, the Army ROTC supply office will issue uniforms and equipment. Upon enrollment completion or student withdrawal, the uniforms and equipment must be returned to Army ROTC within 72 hours. The deposit is returned to students who complete the course and return all assigned uniforms and equipment.

Military Science (MIL) Course Descriptions

MIL 101 and MIL 102 Beginning Army Fitness Training. 1 hour.

Students participate in and learn the fundamentals of physical fitness programs. Emphasis is on the development of an individual fitness program and the role of exercise and fitness in daily life.

MIL 110 Leadership and National Security. 1 hour.

This course educates students in the fundamentals of leadership and national security. Using the U.S. Army as a case study, students examine military organizational culture, roles and missions of the armed forces, leadership management, and leader communication skills. Additionally, through practical exercises, students develop individual leadership skills in problem solving, land navigation, and rifle marksmanship. The course counts toward credit for completion of the Army ROTC Basic Course, entrance into the Army ROTC Advance Course, and eventual commissioning as an officer in the U.S. Army. Students taking this course do not incur any military obligation. Course meets one time per week in accordance with the fall schedule of classes.

MIL 120 Foundations of Leadership & Team Development. 1 hour.

Course serves as a sequel to MIL 110 Leadership and National Security and educates students in the fundamental military skills. Using the MIL 110 class as a foundation, students examine mission analysis, time management, leadership management, and leader communication skills. Through practical exercises, students develop individual leadership skills in problem solving, land navigation, and rifle marksmanship. The course counts toward credit for completion of the Army ROTC Basic Course, entrance into the Army ROTC Advance Course, and eventual commissioning as an officer in the U.S. Army. Students taking this course do not incur any military obligation. Course meets one time per week in accordance with the spring schedule of classes.

MIL 111 and MIL 121 Leadership Application I and II Lab. 1 hour.

Course provides students the opportunity to apply leadership theory in a wide range of scenarios. Using small unit tactics as a vehicle, students learn a series of individual technical skills and then transition to leading fellow students in collective tasks. This course meets biweekly in accordance with the fall/spring schedule of classes.

MIL 201 and 202 Intermediate Army Fitness Training. 1 hour.

Students participate in and learn how to conduct an Army physical fitness program. This program teaches the principles of fitness of frequency, intensity, time, and type of exercise through participation and practical exercise. This course teaches adoption of the healthy physical fitness ethos and lifestyle required of Army officers. Students are given performance reviews based on the current Army Physical Fitness Test (APFT) evaluation criteria.

MIL 210 Basic Leadership Skills. 2 hours.

This course builds on MIL 120. Students focus on leadership development and officership. Throughout the course students learn personal development, problem solving, planning, teamwork, Army values, and the basics of physical fitness. There are also several practical exercises in which the student will learn beginner skills such as knot tying, rope bridging, land navigation, and marksmanship. This course counts toward credit for completion of the U.S. Army ROTC Basic Course and eventual commissioning as an officer in the U.S. Army. Students taking this course do not incur any military obligation. The course meets twice a week per the fall schedule of classes.

MIL 220 Military Leadership Skills. 2 hours.

This class is a sequel to MIL 210 Basic Military Skills. There is a continued focus on leadership development through practical exercises and classroom interaction. Some of the topics covered are goal setting, oral communication, decision making, teamwork, and stress management. There is also a continuation of basic skills such as land navigation and map reading. This semester, more than any before, draws together the various components of values, communications, decision making, and leadership to focus on the qualities required of a commissioned officer. Upon completion of this semester, cadets should possess a fundamental understanding of both leadership and officership and demonstrate the ability to apply this understanding to real-world situations. This course counts toward credit for completion of the U.S. Army ROTC Basic Course and eventual commissioning as an officer in the U.S. Army. Students taking this course do not incur any military obligation. The course meets twice weekly per the spring schedule of classes.

MIL 211 and MIL 221 Military Leadership and Management Application I and II Lab. 1 hour.

This course uses a series of demonstrations and practical exercise scenarios to develop basic leadership competency. Students have the opportunity to observe and experiment with different leadership and management techniques. The course instills individual leadership confidence and provides a structured mechanism for identifying leadership potential. Each course meets once weekly per the fall/spring schedule of classes.

MIL 250 Leader’s Training Course. 6 hours.

This 28-day leader internship is taught as an off-campus extension course each summer at Fort Knox, Kentucky. It is open to students who have a minimum of 48 semester hours and at least four semesters of degree work remaining (undergraduate or graduate) after completion of the course. The Army provides transportation to and from Fort Knox. Students receive free room and board and are paid for their attendance. They participate in hands-on leadership exercises and receive training in marksmanship, rappelling, water survival, land navigation, and small unit tactics. Course participants are eligible to validate or compete for two-year scholarships. For information, contact Army ROTC at (205) 348-1056.

MIL 310 Small Unit Tactical Leadership. 3 hours.

Course studies development of leadership and small unit tactics that provide training and education in becoming a commissioned officer in the U.S. Army. Students participate in a series of practical exercises to enhance leadership skills and receive personal assessments of and developmental training in leadership competencies. Students produce both written and oral guidance for team members to accomplish tasks. Additionally, cadets receive out-of-class training during field exercises, physical training, and leadership labs. Participation in leadership development lab is required. Class meets three times weekly in accordance with the schedule of classes.

MIL 320 Advanced Military Leadership. 3 hours.

Course continues the development of student competencies and confidence through intermediate leadership, technical, and tactical instruction. Students lead small groups in accomplishing tasks of increasing complexity. Significant training in oral briefing and time management during time-constrained and stressful situations is used to improve decision-making skills. It examines the importance of ethical decision making in improving team performance. It requires participation in leadership development lab. Class meets three times weekly in accordance with the fall/spring schedule of classes.

MIL 311 and MIL 321 Small Unit Leadership Applications I and II Lab. 1 hour.

Series of practical applications of small unit tactics, leadership skills, and technical competencies learned in the classroom. Participation is required of all MIL 310 and MIL 320 students. Class meets weekly per the fall/spring schedule of classes.

MIL 335 American Military Experience. 3 hours.

Course provides an introduction to and overview of American military history with a focus on the U.S. Army. Follows the origins of the American military experience from Anglo-American colonial warfare to the present; includes America’s major wars and the evolution of military technology. This class meets two times a week per the fall/spring schedule of classes.

MIL 410 Ethics and the Military as a Profession. 3 hours.

Course studies distinguishing characteristics of professionalism and how they relate to the military as a profession. Emphasis is on ethical decision making and obligations of officership in a democratic society. Interpersonal skills and behavioral processes are covered and applied in practical exercises to further develop student management and leadership skills. Class meets twice per week per the fall/spring schedule of classes.

MIL 411 and MIL 421 Advanced Leadership Applications Lab I and II. 3 hours.

Course educates students in executive leadership management and prepares them for post-commissioning tasks as Army officers. Students fill basic command and staff positions and are responsible for planning, coordinating, and conducting the Corps of Cadets training activities. This class meets weekly per the fall/spring schedule of classes.

MIL 420 Advanced Leadership and Management Techniques. 3 hours.

Course studies advanced leadership with an emphasis on command and staff processes, training management fundamentals, communication processes, and problem solving and instructional techniques with a concentration on military applications. Individual and group motivational and behavioral processes are exercised to further develop student management and leadership skills. This class meets two times a week per the fall/spring schedule of classes.

MIL 490 Enhanced Leadership Study. 3 hours.

Independent leadership focusing on advanced leadership applications, distinguishing characteristics of professionalism, and how they relate to officership in a democratic society. Additional emphasis is placed on researching a specific leadership issue and/or problem solving and solution development. Interpersonal skills and behavioral processes are covered and applied in faculty exercise reviews to further develop the student’s management and leadership skills.

MIL 493-497, Independent Study Series. 1 hour each. This series is restricted to contracted cadets and commissioned officers; it requires permission of the Professor of Military Science and an Army Knowledge Online account to enroll. Individual courses are Design Fitness Program, Risk Management and Safety, Academic Mentorship Program, Operations Planning, Ethical Foundations, and Human Resources Internship.

Faculty

CLARK, DAN, Major, EdD (The University of Alabama). Professor of Military Science and Department Head

TRAYLOR, KENDRICK, Major, MA (The University of Alabama). Assistant Professor of Military Science

LAKE, JAMES, Major, MBA (The University of Alabama-Birmingham). Assistant Professor of Military Science

SUMMERS, CALVIN, Major, BS (Troy State University). Assistant Professor of Military Science and Enrollment Advisor

DOLLAR, JOHN, Major, BS (University of North Alabama). Assistant Professor of Military Science

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