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DEPARTMENT AND PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS

A total of 120 hours, distributed as follows, are required for the bachelor of science in business administration degree.

General Education Courses
Required courses
CoursesHours
EC 110 and EC 111 6
EN 101 and EN 102 6
MATH 112 and MATH 121, or MATH 115 and MATH 1251 6
ST 2603
___
Total: 21
 
Restricted non-commerce electives26–34
 
Natural science. Eight semester hours of science courses designated N, including at least 2 semester hours of laboratory experience.
 
Humanities and fine arts. 12 semester hours consisting of at least 3 hours of literature* and at least 3 hours in the arts. The remaining 6 hours are to be chosen from the humanities and/or fine arts.
 
History and social and behavioral sciences. 12 semester hours with at least 3 hours in history* and at least 6 hours chosen from among other disciplines in the social and behavioral sciences. EC 110 and EC 111 (required above) satisfy 6 hours of this requirement.
 
*Each student must complete a 6-semester-hour sequence in either literature or history.
 
Foreign language or computer language. Either two semesters of one foreign language designated FL (6–8 hours) or two semesters of C-designated computer language courses (6 hours). This requirement may be satisfied by completing ST 260 and one additional C-designated course.2
___
Total: 47–55 hours
 
Business Administration Functional Field Courses
 
Lower Division
AC 210 Introduction to Accounting4
LGS 200 Legal Environment of Business3
___
Total: 7
 
Upper Division
Applicants for the upper division in the Culverhouse College of Commerce and Business Administration must complete at least 60 semester hours prior to admission to the upper division. The 60 hours should be chosen from the requirements listed above and must include degree credit for EC 110 and EC 111; MATH 112 and MATH 121, or MATH 115 and MATH 125; EN 101 and EN 102; AC 210; ST 260; and LGS 200 (or their equivalents); and at least 4 hours of natural science, 3 hours of fine arts, literature, or humanities, and 3 hours of history or social and behavioral sciences. Failure to earn degree credit for these specific courses and to earn at least 60 semester hours in all will make students ineligible for admission to the upper division and for enrollment in 300- and 400-level C&BA courses.
 
FI 302 Business Finance3
GBA 490 Strategic Management3
MGT 300 Organizational Theory and Behavior3
MGT 395 Managerial Communication Strategies3
MKT 300 Marketing3
OM 300 Introduction to Operations Management3
___
18
___
Total: 25 hours
 
Major Program Courses18
See the departmental listings below for the requirements in each major.
 
Electives22–30
 
GBA 145, Orientation to Commerce and Business Administration, is highly recommended for students who enter the College as freshmen.
 
Some departments may specify some of the elective courses. Students should consult their major department for information.
 
All business students are required to take at least one course that has an international focus. The course can be selected from courses in international business or from approved courses with international content in other colleges. Students should consult with their advisor for a list of approved courses.
___
Total for BS degree: 120 hours

1Students with the required high-school units in mathematics are classified by means of standardized placement tests; only those with satisfactory placement test scores are admitted to MATH 112. Students who do not make satisfactory scores should complete MATH 100 before taking MATH 112. MATH 100 may be counted toward the degree as a non-commerce elective. In certain cases, students with very weak backgrounds in mathematics may be required to complete MATH 005, which is a noncredit course. Students who concentrate in quantitative finance are required to complete MATH 112, MATH 125, and MATH 126. Other majors require students to complete MATH 112 and MATH 121, or MATH 115 and MATH 125. MATH 125 and MATH 126 are 4-hour courses.
2Foreign language/computer language requirement. Students must complete two semesters (6–8 hours) of a foreign language designated FL or earn equivalent credit by examination; or they must earn 6 semester hours in C-designated courses. Foreign language courses must be selected from non-commerce electives taken to meet the general education requirements. Students enrolling in C courses are expected to have basic computer application skills. Students lacking these skills, as determined by university policy, will be required to take a course or courses designed to develop the required skills. Credit for the course will count as part of the students’ electives.

SUGGESTED COURSES FOR FRESHMAN AND SOPHOMORE YEARS

The following suggested course sequences for freshman and sophomore PREB (pre-business) students are intended to assist students in planning their schedules to include the required pre-business coursework. Academic advisors for C&BA students are available in the A.H. Bean Undergraduate Student Services Center, 10 Bidgood Hall.

Suggested Course Sequence, MATH 100
 
FRESHMAN YEAR
First Semester
CoursesHours
Fine arts elective3
EN 1013
GBA 1451
MATH 1003
History elective*3
Humanities or fine arts elective3
___
16
 
Second Semester
CoursesHours
EC 1103
EN 1023
MATH 1123
Natural science elective4
Free elective (MIS 200 for general business majors)3
___
16
 
SOPHOMORE YEAR
First Semester
CoursesHours
EC 1113
MATH 121 or MATH 1253
History or social and behavioral sciences elective*3
Literature elective*3
Natural science elective4
___
16
 
Second Semester
CoursesHours
AC 2104
LGS 2003
ST 2603
Free elective3
Literature or humanities/fine arts elective*3
___
16
 
Suggested Course Sequence, MATH 112
 
FRESHMAN YEAR
First Semester
CoursesHours
Fine arts elective3
EC 1103
EN 1013
GBA 1451
MATH 1123
History elective*3
___
16
Second Semester
CoursesHours
EC 1113
EN 1023
MATH 121 or MATH 1253
Free elective (MIS 200 for General Business Majors)3
Natural science elective4
___
16
 
SOPHOMORE YEAR
First Semester
CoursesHours
ST 2603
History or social and behavioral sciences elective*3
Humanities/fine arts elective3
Literature elective*3
Natural science elective4
___
16
Second Semester
CoursesHours
AC 2104
LGS 2003
Free electives6
Literature or humanities/fine arts elective*3
___
16

*Each student must complete a 6-semester-hour sequence in either literature or history.

MAJORS AND SPECIALIZATIONS IN BUSINESS

Majors

The following majors are offered in business. Each major requires 18 hours of courses.

Accounting
Economics
Finance
General Business
Management
Management Information Systems
Marketing
Operations Management

In addition to the requirements for the major, students are encouraged to complete a second major, specialization in business, and/or a major or minor outside of business. Students should consult with their advisors and major departments about approved courses of study. Some majors require specializations.

Specializations

Specializations are intended to extend a student’s knowledge of a specific discipline beyond that provided by the major or to provide a general background in a discipline other than the major to broaden a student’s understanding of business. The number of hours required for a specialization varies and depends on courses taken in the student’s major. Students should consult their advisor or major department concerning specializations available for their major.

Accounting
Actuarial Sciences
Banking and Financial Services (finance majors only)
Business Intelligence
Consumer Marketing
Economics
e-Decision Support
Entrepreneurship
Finance
Financial Management (finance majors only)
Global Business
Health Care Management
Human Resource Strategy
Insurance
International Economics (economics majors only)
International Finance (finance majors only)
Investment Management (finance majors only)
Macroeconomic and Monetary Policy (economics majors only)
Personal Wealth Management
Production Management (operations management majors only)
Professional Accounting (accounting majors only)
Professional Sales
Public Policy and Law (economics majors only)
Quantitative Economics (economics majors only)
Quantitative Finance (finance majors only)
Real Estate
Supply Chain Management

Culverhouse School of Accountancy (AC)

Professor Mary S. Stone, Director
Office: 314 Alston Hall

Students should consult the Culverhouse School of Accountancy Web site at cba.ua.edu/accounting for additional information about admission and program requirements.

The School of Accountancy was established in July 1978 as an academic unit of the College of Commerce and Business Administration. The School was named in honor of Hugh F. Culverhouse Sr. in February 1989. Culverhouse was an alumnus of The University of Alabama, a noted lawyer and businessman, and a major supporter of the accountancy program. The Culverhouse School of Accountancy is a charter member of the Federation of Schools of Accountancy. The School holds accounting accreditation at both the undergraduate and graduate levels. In addition to the bachelor of science degree, the Culverhouse School of Accountancy offers two professional master’s degrees, the master of accountancy (MAcc) and the master of tax accounting (MTA); and a doctor of philosophy (PhD) degree with a concentration in accounting.

Admission and retention policies. A prospective Culverhouse School of Accountancy student must submit an application that demonstrates that all criteria for admission have been met. Students are eligible for admission if they meet the criteria for admission to the upper division of the College of Commerce and Business Administration. A student whose grade point average falls below these standards may petition the director of the Culverhouse School of Accountancy for admission to the upper division and Culverhouse School of Accountancy if the student’s grade point average for the last 30 hours attempted is 2.5 or higher.

Students who have not been admitted to the School may enroll in upper-division accounting courses offered for non-majors. A student who has not been admitted may also enroll in 300-level accounting courses offered for accounting majors, provided that he or she has fulfilled the prerequisites for those courses and either meets the criteria for admission to the Culverhouse School of Accountancy or must take those courses as part of the major or minor. Only students who have been admitted to the Culverhouse School of Accountancy may enroll in 400-level accounting courses without special permission of the director.

Accounting majors must complete all 300-level accounting courses with grades of “C-” or better. A student who enrolls in any of these courses twice and fails to make a grade of “C-” or better will not be permitted to take additional accounting courses without special permission. Enrollment is defined as registration for a course resulting in the recording of hours attempted on the student’s record. Priority for enrollment in upper-division accounting courses is given to students who are not repeating the courses.

Students wishing to sit for the CPA examination in Alabama must have completed 150 semester hours of college courses. To meet this requirement, students in the Culverhouse School of Accountancy must be admitted to either the master of accountancy or master of tax accounting programs. Students should apply for admission to one of these graduate programs during the first semester of their senior year. The professional accounting specialization is required for students entering the masters’ programs in accounting.

Major Program Requirements
CoursesHours
AC 310 Financial Reporting and Analysis of Business Activities I3
AC 311 Financial Reporting and Analysis of Business Activities II3
AC 361 Cost Analysis for Planning and Control3
AC 371 Introduction to Taxation3
AC 389 Accounting Information Systems Development, Operations, and
    Control3
AC 432 Introduction to Corporate Governance, Risk Assessment, and
    Assurance Services 3
__
Total: 18 hours

Department of Economics, Finance, and Legal Studies (EC, FI, LGS)

Professor Billy P. Helms, Department Head
Office: 200 Alston Hall

ECONOMICS

The University’s economics programs offer an extensive variety of courses to develop the student’s analytical abilities and prepare graduates for rewarding careers in business, industry, and government. Economics also provides a sound foundation for postgraduate study in a wide variety of fields. The department offers a major in economics through both C&BA and the College of Arts and Sciences. Students majoring in other fields in C&BA may select economics as a non-commerce minor. Students majoring or minoring in economics are urged to consult the undergraduate advisor for recommendation of 400-level economics courses and general electives consistent with their career goals and objectives.

Economics majors must complete the “C” requirement by taking one of the following (or a similar course) approved by the department: AC 389, FI 389, OM 385, or MKT 385. Economics majors must also select a specialization or a second major. A minimum of 18 hours is required for a second major. Students may choose any second major (business or non-business) with a plan approved by the Department. Approved majors already exist for math and modern languages. Students selecting non-business minors must also complete a specialization in business. Faculty Advisor: Cover

Major in Economics
Major Program Requirements1
CoursesHours
EC 308 Intermediate Microeconomics23
EC 309 Intermediate Macroeconomics23
FI 301 Introduction to Financial Institutions and Markets3
Additional EC courses9
___
Total: 18 hours
 
1EC 470 is strongly recommended for those considering graduate work in economics or business.
2A grade of “C” or higher is required in EC 308 and EC 309.
 
Dual Major in Economics and Mathematics
The dual major in economics and mathematics is for students with strong quantitative skills who want to apply those skills in the field of economics. This curriculum is ideal for students who plan a career that involves forecasting and/or an understanding of formal economic modeling. It also provides students with the mathematical background necessary for pursuing a doctoral degree in economics. Students in this degree program are formally enrolled in the Culverhouse College of Commerce, but the curriculum is determined by both the College of Commerce and the College of Arts and Sciences. Faculty Advisor: Cover
 
Major Program Requirements1
CoursesHours
EC 308 Intermediate Microeconomics*3
EC 309 Intermediate Macroeconomics*3
EC 389 Computerized Management Information Systems3
EC 471 Econometrics3
EC elective3
FI 301 Financial Institutions and Markets3
MATH 355 Theory of Probability3
MATH 451 Mathematical Statistics I3
___
Total: 24 hours
 
*A grade of “C-” or higher is required in EC 308 and EC 309.
 
In addition to the economics major, the following courses are required for the major in mathematics:
CoursesHours
EC 4133
MATH 227 Calculus III4
MATH 237 Applied Matrix Theory or
    MATH 257 Linear Algebra3
MATH 238 Applied Differential Equations I3
MATH 486 Introduction to Real Analysis I3
MATH elective (300 or 400 level)3
___
Total: 19 hours

FINANCE

Finance majors must complete the “C” requirement by taking one of the following or a similar course approved by the department: AC 389, FI 389, OM 385, or MKT 385. Finance majors also must select a specialization or a second major. A minimum of 18 hours is required for a second major. Students may choose any second major (business or non-business) with a plan approved by the Department. Approved majors already exist for Math and Modern Languages. Students selecting non-business minors must also complete a specialization in business.

Major Program Requirements
CoursesHours
EC 308 Intermediate Microeconomics3
EC 309 Intermediate Macroeconomics3
FI 301 Introduction to Financial Institutions and Markets 3
FI 410 Intermediate Financial Management3
FI 412 Money and Capital Markets3
FI 414 Investments3
___
Total: 18 hours
 
Dual Major in Finance and Mathematics
 
The dual major in finance and mathematics is for students with strong quantitative skills who want to apply those skills in the field of finance. This curriculum is ideal for students who plan a career that requires an understanding of financial modeling or intend to go to graduate school. Students in this degree program are formally enrolled in the Culverhouse College of Commerce, but the curriculum is determined by both the College of Commerce and the College or Arts and Sciences. Faculty Advisors: Brooks, Helms, and Schlesinger.
 
Major Program Requirements
CoursesHours
EC 308 Intermediate Microeconomics3
EC 309 Intermediate Macroeconomics3
FI 301 Introduction to Financial Institutions and Markets3
FI 410 Intermediate Financial Markets3
FI 389 Computerized Management Information Systems3
FI 412 Money and Capital Markets3
FI 414 Investments3
MATH 355 Theory of Probability3
MATH 451 Mathematical Statistics with Applications I3
___
Total: 27 hours
 
In addition to the finance major, the following courses are required for the major in mathematics:
 
CoursesHours
EC 413 Economic Forecasting and Analysis3
MATH 227 Calculus III4
MATH 237 Applied Matrix Theory or
    MATH 257 Linear Algebra3
MATH 238 Applied Differential Equations I3
MATH 486 Introduction to Real Analysis I3
MATH elective (300 or 400 level)3
___
Total: 19 hours

Department of Information Systems, Statistics, and Management Science (MIS, OM, ST)

Professor Michael D. Conerly, Department Head
Office: 300 Alston Hall

MANAGEMENT INFORMATION SYSTEMS

The MIS program provides its students with the core business and technology knowledge to excel as they start their careers in roles such as business application developer, business analyst, or process consultant. Graduates choose among e-business opportunities in consulting, corporate, government and not-for-profit organizations. The program culminates with a two semester, 6 hour block per semester practicum in which Master’s students lead teams of MIS seniors to understand an industry sponsored business problem and its causes and effects, determine the features needed to solve the problem, and then design, build, test and deliver the solution. Continual client feedback and faculty guidance ensures project success and educational growth. For more details, visit cba.ua.edu/mis. Program Director: D. Hale Academic Advisor: Heather Davis

Admission and retention policies. Each prospective MIS student must submit an application demonstrating that all criteria for admission have been met. A student is eligible for admission if he or she (1) meets the criteria for admission to the upper division of the Culverhouse College of Commerce and Business Administration; (2) has completed at least 61 semester hours of college credit with a cumulative GPA of 2.5 or higher for all coursework attempted, or a GPA of 3.0 or higher for the last 30 hours attempted; and (3) has completed CS 114, CS 116, CS 124, and MIS 295 with grades of “C-” or better. A student whose GPA falls below this standard may petition for a review of his or her record. Sophomore students that meet the course requirements and MIS admission major GPA requirement may take 1 MIS course prior to achieving junior status.

MIS 295 is recommended for students who are interested in majoring in MIS. MIS 200 is an introductory course for non-majors and can be taken by freshman.

Management information systems majors must complete all required MIS courses with a grade of “C-” or better. A student who enrolls in any of the required MIS courses twice and fails to earn a passing grade will not be permitted to take additional MIS courses or to receive a degree with MIS as the major from The University of Alabama. Enrollment is defined as registration for a course resulting in the recording of hours attempted on the student’s record. A grade of “W” is counted as an enrollment. Priority for enrollment in upper-division MIS courses is given to students who are not repeating the courses.

MIS students are encouraged to complete MIS 340 Data Communications and Networks and to earn a computer science minor consisting of CS 114, CS 124, CS 325, CS 375, CS 415, and an additional 400-level CS course approved by the MIS program director and the CS department head

Major Program Requirements
CoursesHours
MIS 320 Application and Information Architecture3
MIS 330 Database Administration 3
MIS 430 Systems Analysis and Design I3
MIS 431 Systems Analysis and Design II3
MIS 450 Systems Construction and Implementation I3
MIS 451 Systems Construction and Implementation II3
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Total: 18 hours

OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT

Operations management (OM) focuses on the effective management of the resources and activities that produce and deliver the goods and services of any business. OM professionals manage the people, materials, equipment, and information resources that a business needs to produce and deliver its goods and services. They also design and manage the business processes and activities that actually produce those goods or services. Business operations are a critical element of every business, so there is a wide range of opportunities for OM professionals. Manufacturing management has been and continues to be a significant area of opportunity. The tremendous growth of the automotive industry in the state of Alabama has produced great job opportunities for OM professionals with major automobile manufacturers and their suppliers. OM professionals can also pursue careers in the distribution and warehousing of products as well as transportation and logistics operations. In fact the entire field of supply chain management relies heavily on the effective management and coordination of business operations, from manufacturing to transportation and distribution. Whether products that are sold in the U.S. are manufactured overseas or in the U.S., at least some part of the supply chain must be operated and managed in the U.S. The growth of service industries in the state, such as banking, also provides opportunities for OM professionals to manage business operations in service-oriented companies. OM professionals hold a wide range of different job titles such as materials manager, production planner, scheduler, inventory manager, transportation/logistics manager, purchasing/procurement manager, supply chain manager, and quality manager. However, they all employ OM techniques and concepts to effectively manage the resources and processes of their business operations. Because OM professionals are familiar with the resources and operations that are critical to success, they are often well-positioned for promotion to upper levels of business management. OM majors must take OM 385 to complete their computer (C-designation) requirement.

Faculty Advisors: Sox and Petty
Academic Advisor: Heather Davis

Major Program Requirements
CoursesHours
OM 310 Introduction to Management Science3
OM 321 Production Planning and Control3
OM 420 Computer Simulation3
OM 422 Operations Scheduling 3
OM 423 Inventory Management3
ST 475 Statistical Quality Control 3
___
Total: 18 hours

Department of Management and Marketing (MGT, MKT)

Professor Rob Morgan, Department Head
Office: 104 Alston Hall

MANAGEMENT

Management is a major that focuses on the crucial processes by which the resources of an organization are systematically directed toward the achievement of its mission. Management majors gain the flexibility to apply their skills in a variety of settings. Some graduates work in international management. Others go to work in small business environments; still others begin their professional careers as management trainees in large organizations.

Major Program Requirements
CoursesHours
MGT 301 Introduction to Human Resources Management3
MGT 320 Leadership3
IBA 350 Introduction to World Business3
MGT 386 Fundamentals of Entrepreneurship3
MGT 341 Contemporary Ethical Issues & Corporate Responsibility3
MKT 410 Innovation3
___
Total: 18 hours

MARKETING

Marketing is concerned with (1) the identification and assessment of consumer and industrial market needs and (2) the development of marketing programs to satisfy those needs. Marketing personnel in profit and nonprofit organizations analyze markets and industries to define new opportunities and refine existing opportunities. Marketers are also responsible for developing and managing products, promotional programs, distribution systems, and prices that are appropriate to the targeted market opportunities. Students who major in marketing enjoy a wide range of employment opportunities. Entry-level opportunities exist in sales and sales management, retail management, product and brand management, market research, advertising, distribution and logistics, purchasing, and other areas. Faculty Advisors: Allaway, Beatty, Davis, D’Souza, Ellinger, Franke, Hill, Morgan, Motes, Mothersbaugh, Reynolds, and Richey

Major Program Requirements
Each marketing major is required to earn a “C-” or better in all courses in the major.
 
CoursesHours
MKT 313 Buyer Behavior 3
MKT 337 Personal Selling3
MKT 411 Supply Chain Management3
MKT 410 Innovation3
MGT 320 Leadership 3
MKT 487 Strategic Marketing 3
___
Total: 18 hours

General Business

The general business major program is designed for students desiring a broad understanding of business that spans all facets of the business enterprise and provides students with a broad philosophical and economic perspective about business operations.

This major is intended for business students who wish to gain breadth within their undergraduate studies. It is particularly appropriate for students who wish to combine a study of business with a minor or extended coursework in a non-business field. The general business major is also suitable for students who intend to pursue a specialized master’s degree in business or who are interested in law school or other professional fields.

A minimum grade point average of 2.0 is required for admission to the general business major. Faculty Advisor: McLeod

Major Program Requirements
CoursesHours
AC 351 Managerial Accounting Decisions or
    AC 352 Corporate Financial Reporting3
EC 400 Analysis of Economic Conditions
    at the Micro/Macro Levels3
FI 400 Financial Institutions, Markets, and Investment3
MGT 320 Leadership or
    MGT 341 Contemporary Ethical Issues and
    Corporate Responsibility or MGT 386 Foundations
    of Entrepreneurship3
MIS 200 Fundamentals of Management Information Systems3
MKT 310 Introduction to Electronic Commerce or
    MKT 313 Buyer Behavior or
    MKT 321 Retail Management or
    MKT 337 Personal Selling or
    MKT 444 Promotional Management3
___
Total: 18 hours

Dual Major in Business and Foreign Language

The modern business environment is truly global, and the dual major provides students the training necessary to succeed in that environment. The dual-major student completes a degree and a major in management, management information systems, marketing, finance, or economics, as well as a second major in French, German, or Spanish. The result is a superior skill set derived from cutting-edge business training and thorough study of a language and the culture associated with it. Such a program creates students who are technically proficient, culturally sensitive, and flexible enough to deal with the business challenges of the future.

Dual-Major-Program Courses

In addition to the requirements for a major in business, students must complete the requirements in a foreign language described in the following sections. Students should consult with their academic advisor about current requirements for dual-degree programs.

Choose one of the following four language majors:

French Track (FLFR)
Required FLFR Core Courses
Language courses (FR 201 and FR 202)6
Civilization/culture courses (FR 331, FR 361, FR 431,
   FR 461, or topic-appropriate FR 470 or FR 480
6
Literature courses (FR 341 or FR 351 and
    topic-appropriate FR 470 or FR 480 or
    other literature course or both FR 341 and FR 351
6
 
Other Requirements for the FLFR Track
15 additional hours of FR courses at the 300 level or above, which must include FR 321 French Studies I: Voices of France, FR 323 French Studies III: Contemporary France and Francophonie, and FR 324 Commercial French. A minimum of 12 hours of coursework at the 300 level or above must be earned on this campus. Related course from other departments must first receive approval from the French advisor.
 
Total hours for FLFR33
 
German Track (FLGN)
Required FLGN Core Courses
Language courses (GN 201 and GN 202)6
Civilization/culture courses (GN 371 and GN 372)6
Literature courses (GN 403 or GN 404 and
    one additional literature course or
    both GN 403 and GN 404)
6
 
Other requirements of the FLGN track
14 additional hours of GN coursework, which must include GN 361 Intermediate Conversation and Composition I and GN 365 Business German. GN 450 Intermediate Business German is highly recommended. A minimum of 12 hours of coursework at the 300 level or above must be earned on this campus. German electives must be numbered 250 or higher. Related courses from other departments must first receive approval from the German advisor.
 
Total hours for FLGN32
 
Spanish
SP 353 Spanish Conversation3
SP 356 Advanced Grammar and Composition3
SP 360 Commercial Spanish3
SP 364 Spanish Civilization3
SP 366 Spanish-American Civilization3
 
Choose two of the following:
SP 371 Survey of Spanish Literature
SP 372 Spanish Literature
SP 375 Masterpieces of Spanish-American Literature I
SP 376 Masterpieces of Spanish-American Literature II6
SP 400-level elective3
SP 400-level elective3
___
Total hours for Spanish27

University Scholars Programs

The University Scholars Program allows students to pursue graduate and undergraduate degrees concurrently. These programs are available in several business disciplines and serve students who have exceptional ability. Students should contact their major department for details.

Specializations

Specializations are offered in the areas listed below. The list is subject to change, and students should consult with their advisor and major department about current offerings. Students must meet all course-specific prerequisites for each course in a specialization and must meet the requirements for admission to the upper division of the College in order to take 300- and 400- level courses.

Accounting
For non-accounting-majors
AC 310, AC 311, and one of the following: AC 361, AC 371, AC 389

Actuarial Science
Students taking this specialization must complete the calculus sequence. Non-finance majors will need to take FI 410 and FI 414 if they plan to sit for the actuarial exams.
ST 454, ST 455, ST 452, FI 419, FI 389, EC 413, FI 341

Applied Microeconomics
Students must major in economics.
Three of the following:
EC 410, EC 412, EC 423, EC 430, EC 444, EC 480

Banking and Financial Services
Students must major in finance.
FI 421, FI 341, and AC 351 or AC 352

Business Intelligence
OM 310, MIS 440, ST 451

Consumer Marketing
Three of the following: MKT 310, MKT 321, MKT 444, MKT 473, APR 331

Economics
For non-economics-majors
EC 308, EC 309, and two electives in economics

e-Decision Support
MIS 200, MIS 340, MIS 440

Entrepreneurship
MGT 482, MGT 486, and one of the following: GBA 322, MGT 421, MKT 473

Finance
For non-finance-majors
EC 308, FI 301, and two of the following: FI 410, FI 412, FI 414

Financial Management
Students must major in finance.
FI 411 (may be substituted for FI 412 in the finance major), FI 413 (may be substituted for EC 309 in the finance major), AC 310, AC 311, AC 361. AC 389 should be taken to meet the C requirement.

Global Business
IBA 350, IBA 351, MKT 455, IBA 460

Health Care Management
HCM 370, HCM 371, HCM 473, HCM 492

Human Resource Strategy
Three of the following: MGT 411, MGT 420, MGT 427, MGT 432, MGT 477, MGT 478

Insurance
FI 341 and five of the following (three will count as part of the finance major):
FI 360, FI 410, FI 412, FI 414, FI 442, FI 443, FI 444

International Economics
Students must major in economics and must have at least three years of foreign language and spend a semester abroad.
IBA 350, EC 430, EC 431

International Finance
Students must major in finance and must have at least 3 years of foreign language and spend a semester abroad.
IBA 350, FI 431, EC 430

Investment Management
Students must major in finance.
FI 415, FI 419, AC 351

Macroeconomic and Monetary Policy
Students must major in economics.
EC 416, EC 431, EC 413

Personal Wealth Management
Non-finance majors will need to complete FI 414 to sit for the Certified Financial Planner exam.
FI 341, AC 371, LGS 403, FI 444, FI 360

Production Management
Students must major in operations management.
OM 425, OM 487, OM 497, OM elective

Professional Accounting
The professional accounting specialization is designed for students who plan to go to graduate school to receive a master’s degree in accounting (MAcc or MTA) and/or sit for the CPA exam.
AC 456, AC 471, and one of the following: AC 492, FI 410, FI 411, FI 412,
FI 414, FI 442, elective approved by advisor

Professional Selling
MKT 338, MKT 437, MKT 473

Public Policy and Law
Students must major in economics.
Three of the following: EC 410, EC 412, EC 423, EC 444, EC 480, EC 482

Quantitative Economics
Students must major in economics.
EC 413, EC 470, EC 471

Quantitative Finance
Students must major in finance and complete the calculus sequence and MATH 237 and MATH 238.
EC 413, ST 454, ST 455, FI 419

Real Estate Specialization
FI 331, FI 436, LGS 407, and two of the following (will count as part of the finance major): FI 412, FI 414, FI 432, FI 334

Supply Chain Management
OM 417, OM 427, MKT 460, MKT 422

Certificate in Ethics and Social Responsibility

Students in business are encouraged to complete a Certificate in Ethics and Social Responsibility, which will be recognized on their transcripts. Goals of the program are to increase students’ abilities to recognize moral dilemmas and exercise moral decision-making abilities and to develop insights into contemporary ethical issues faced by individuals and organizations. In addition, a goal of the program is to focus campus attention on the importance of addressing ethical issues and creating graduates who will be recognized for having formally addressed these issues.

Requirements:

  1. One course with a primary ethics and social responsibility focus selected from a preapproved list such as PHL 200 Introduction to Ethics, and MGT 341 Contemporary Ethical Issues and Corporate Responsibility.
  2. One course in service learning selected from a preapproved list.
  3. Participation in four activities or events with approved ethics and social responsibility content. These events would include presentations on relevant subjects and discussion sessions covering readings or other assignments. At least one event should be held each semester.
  4. Participation in Moral Forum at least once.

Certificate in Business Analytical Excellence

Courses required for the Certificate in Business Analytical Excellence provide a background for graduate work in business or for work in technically demanding business fields. This program allows students to utilize the math skills they acquired in high school and to develop quantitative skills equivalent to those developed by engineering graduates. In addition, the designation allows students to signal to employers and graduate programs that they have completed a specialized technical curriculum.

Requirements:

  1. MATH 125, MATH 126, and MATH 227
  2. Three of the following:
        MATH 237
        MATH 238
        ST 454 or MATH 355
        ST 455 or MATH 451
        EC 413
        EC 471
        ST 450
        ST 451
        MATH 422
        MKT 473
  3. A GPA of 3.5 or above at the time of graduation

Minor in Natural Resources Management

Students in the College of Commerce, especially those specializing in real estate may wish to consider the minor in Natural Resources Management offered by the College of Arts and Sciences:

Required Classes
12 hours (meet prerequisites for all elective courses listed) (NS)
CoursesHours
GEO 101 Dynamic Earth or
    GEO 105 Sustainable Earth (lecture and laboratory)
4
GY 101 Principles of Physical Geography: Atmospheric Processes
    (lecture and laboratory)
4
BSC 114 and BSC 115 Principles of Biology I (lecture and laboratory) or
    BSC 116 and BSC 117 Principles of Biology II (lecture and
    (laboratory)
4
 
Elective Classes
9 hours (select from at least two groups)
Earth CoursesHours
GEO 306 Hydrogeology3
GY 363/GEO 363 Geomorphology (lecture and laboratory)3
GY 3__ Climatology3
 
Life CoursesHours
BSC 303 Field Zoology (lecture and laboratory)3
BSC 320 Freshwater Studies (lecture and laboratory)4
BSC 414 Dendrology (lecture and laboratory)3
BSC 415 Ecology of Aquatic Plants and Wetland Ecosystems3
BSC 497 Discovering Alabama3
    (a 1-hour course offered in the summers by the Alabama
    Museum of Natural History)
 
Policy and Process CoursesHours
GY 339 Natural Resources and Environmental Planning3
BSC 482 Conservation Biology (four service-learning experiences)3
 
Practicum/ Internship/Externship—3 hours
CoursesHours
BSC 396 Resident Study at an Approved Biological Station3
BSC 397 Undergraduate Research in Biological Sciences3
GY 483 Environmental Science Internship3
 
Distance Education Course from Auburn University—2 hours
CourseHours
FORY 4820 Forestry in the Private Sector2

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