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MULTIPLE ABILITIES PROGRAM (MAP)

Professor Madeleine Gregg, Program Coordinator
Office: Graves Hall

MAP 301 Professionalism. Three hours.

Prerequisite: Admission to the Multiple Abilities Program.

This course is designed as a developmental sequence of integrated themes covering historical foundations of education, educational finance, legal and ethical issues, contemporary issues, and fundamental technology concepts. The content is expanded in MAP 302, MAP 303, and MAP 405, and these courses are integrated with the other courses in MAP.

MAP 311 The Learner. Three hours.

Prerequisite: Admission to the Multiple Abilities Program.

Related to MAP 312, MAP 313, MAP 414, MAP 415, and other courses in the MAP program, this course is designed as an integrated, developmental sequence covering concepts in education that pertain to human development, language development, literacy acquisition, and multiculturalism. A central theme is the development of skill in observing children and understanding their behavior from a developmental perspective. Group projects, independent study, observation, assigned readings, and field activities are part of the course.

MAP 321 Communication/Collaboration. Three hours.

Prerequisite: Admission to the Multiple Abilities Program.

Related to MAP 322, MAP 323, MAP 424, MAP 425, and other courses in the MAP program, this course introduces concepts of a cooperative partnership between home and school as a vehicle for quality educational experiences. Topics include social functions of speech communication; verbal and nonverbal communication; and skills essential for professional communication.

MAP 331 Facilitating Learning. Three hours.

Prerequisite: Admission to the Multiple Abilities Program.

By observing and participating in classrooms, students acquire understanding of pedagogies appropriate for young children. This course is closely related to other MAP courses carrying the "Facilitating Learning" title (MAP 332, MAP 333, MAP 434, and MAP 435). This course introduces methods of instruction in math, science, literature, and social studies.

MAP 341 Field Experience/Practicum. Four hours.

Prerequisite: Admission to the Multiple Abilities Program.

This practicum is the first of a series of field experiences that MAP candidates undertake during their course of study. In the practicum, students complete observation-based research activities in a variety of general and special education classrooms.

For each of the following MAP courses, prerequisites are (a) successful completion of the previous semester's MAP coursework and (b) admission to the teacher education program.

MAP 302 Professionalism. Three hours.

This course is designed as a developmental sequence of integrated themes covering historical foundations of education, educational finance, legal and ethical issues, contemporary issues, and fundamental technology concepts. The underpinnings of various school reform efforts and their potential effects on classroom practices are a central focus of the course. The content builds upon that of MAP 301 and is integrated with other MAP courses as well.

MAP 312 The Learner. Three hours.

Related to MAP 311, MAP 313, MAP 414, MAP 415, and other courses in the MAP program, this course is designed as an integrated, developmental sequence covering concepts in education that pertain to human development, language development, literacy acquisition, and multiculturalism, as well as concepts of assessment of the learner. The course includes group projects, independent study, observation, assigned readings, and field activities.

MAP 322 Communication/Collaboration. Three hours.

Related to MAP 321, MAP 424, MAP 425, and other MAP courses, this course further explores the concept of cooperative partnership between home and school—and various professionals—as a vehicle for quality educational experiences for children whose needs vary widely (including those with learning and/or behavior disabilities). Skills essential for professional communication, especially those needed for effective collaboration, are a central theme of the course.

MAP 332 Facilitating Learning. Three hours.

Using observation as well as study, students in this course encounter basic concepts of effective instruction of children with diverse needs, including those with learning and/or behavior disabilities. The course covers teaching young children science, math, music, literature, literacy (reading and writing), language arts, and physical education. A central theme of this course (which is closely related to MAP 331, MAP 333, MAP 434, and MAP 435) is use of instructional tactics and strategies to ensure meaningful learning and empowerment of children.

MAP 342 Field Experience/Practicum. Three hours.

This is the second MAP field experience, and it, too, is integrated with the MAP coursework that precedes and follows it. During the semester-long practicum, students serve as apprentices in a mentoring teacher's classroom, engaging in co-planning and co-teaching lessons.

MAP 403 Professionalism. Two hours.

This course extends the developmental themes of MAP 302 (the historical foundations, finance, legal and ethical issues, contemporary issues, and fundamental technology concepts of education) and is integrated with other MAP courses. Developing a "self as professional" perspective is a central theme of the course.

MAP 404 Professionalism. Three hours.

This course extends developmental themes covering education's historical foundations, financing, legal and ethical issues, contemporary issues, and fundamental technology concepts. Emphasis is on gathering and analyzing educational data and information in order to make classroom teaching more effective.

MAP 405 Professionalism. Three hours.

This course extends developmental themes covering education's historical foundations, financing, legal and ethical issues, contemporary issues, and fundamental technology concepts.

MAP 413 The Learner. Two hours.

Related to MAP 311, MAP 312, MAP 414, MAP 415, and other courses in the MAP program, this course is an integrated, developmental sequence exploring the nature of parent-child relations during infancy, childhood, adolescence, and early adulthood as well as educational concepts pertaining to those relations. Topics covered include the effect of family structures on parenting; the effect an exceptional child has on the family; and the relationship between family life and a child's progress in school, including the relationship between cultural patterns in the home and assessment of the learner.

MAP 414 The Learner. Three hours.

The course examines earlier MAP curriculum as it relates to the theory and construction of tests for student assessment. Nonbiased assessment and placement of and intervention with culturally/socially/ economically diverse students are emphasized.

MAP 415 The Learner. Three hours.

Building on MAP 311, MAP 312, MAP 313, and MAP 414, this course develops a sophisticated understanding of human development, human learning, language acquisition, and the social context of all of these. Vygotsky's social learning theories and their practical implications for the multiple abilities classroom are a key focus.

MAP 423 Communication/Collaboration. One hour.

Related to MAP 321, MAP 322, MAP 424, MAP 425, and other MAP courses, the course builds on the concept, introduced earlier, of a cooperative partnership among home, school, and various professionals. The focus is on interpersonal skills needed to communicate effectively with parents through conferencing, notes/letters, and newsletters about curriculum topics, themes, classroom events, and children's work.

MAP 424 Communication/Collaboration. Three hours.

Related to MAP 321, MAP 322, MAP 323, MAP 425, and other MAP courses, the course builds on the concept, introduced earlier, of a cooperative partnership among home, school, and various professionals. The focus is on planning and conducting conferences to establish, communicate, and achieve the goals and essential characteristics of an educational program.

MAP 425 Communication/Collaboration. Three hours.

Related to MAP 321, MAP 322, MAP 323, MAP 424, and other MAP courses, the course builds on the concept, introduced earlier, of a cooperative partnership among home, school, and various professionals. The focus is on planning and conducting conferences to establish, communicate, and achieve the goals and essential characteristics of an educational program. A central theme is the use of social problem-solving skills: conflict resolution, anger diffusion, and crisis intervention.

MAP 433 Facilitating Learning. One hour.

By observing and participating in classrooms, students acquire skills in pedagogy appropriate for young children. This course is closely related to MAP 331, MAP 332, MAP 434, and MAP 435. It concentrates on the employment of community resources and on presentation skills.

MAP 434 Facilitating Learning. Two hours.

By observing and participating in classrooms, students acquire skills in pedagogy appropriate for young children. This course is closely related to MAP 331, MAP 332, MAP 333, and MAP 435. It concentrates on the integration and inclusion of exceptional children and children from diverse backgrounds in various classroom settings: planning for individual needs, modifying objectives and adapting curriculum materials, and personalizing instruction.

MAP 435 Facilitating Learning. Two hours.

Taking previous MAP coursework as its base, the course extends concepts of learning, classroom management, behavior modification, and individual behavior management. Emphasis is on using effective programs and interventions with children of diverse abilities to facilitate social and emotional growth and encourage appropriate behavior.

MAP 443 Field Experience/Summer Enrichment Workshop (SEW) Practicum. Six hours.

This course concentrates on learning strategies, thinking skills, and how to integrate these in one's teaching throughout the instructional program. It explores how distinguishing the cognitive from the affective components of thinking skills can help pupils of all abilities to learn responsibility for the decision-making process and help them express their thoughts.

MAP 444 Field Experience/Special Education Internship. Six hours.

This course begins as an apprenticeship with a mentoring teacher in a special education classroom. It evolves into a 10-week or longer internship in which the student assumes major responsibility for managing and conducting classroom instruction for pupils with mild learning and behavior disabilities.

MAP 445 Field Experience/Regular Classroom Internship. Six hours.

This course begins as an apprenticeship with a mentoring teacher in an elementary general education classroom setting. It evolves into a 10-week or longer internship in which the student assumes major responsibility for managing and conducting the classroom instruction.

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